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Steps To Grow An Avocado Tree From Seed

Avocados are one of the best fruits of all time. Rich in nutrition and flavor. Aside from obstructing satellite TV signals just like every other trees and buildings does, there is nothing wrong with growing avocado tree in your area. Start your summer with a zesty lime guacamole dip with tortilla chips. When making guacamole or avocado toast, try saving your pits to grow into avocado trees. However, It’s surprisingly simple to grow your own avocado tree from seed. This makes a great educational project for home and classrooms. Follow this step by step guide, to learn how to grow an avocado tree from seed.

1. REMOVE AND CLEAN PITTROUBLESHOOTING BUGS

Firstly, You’ll have to begin with removing the pit from the avocado carefully (without cutting it), after that wash it clean of all the remaining avocado fruit. Do not remove the brown skin on the pit – that’s the seed cover.

2. DETERMINE WHICH END IS “UP” AND WHICH END IS “DOWN”

Most avocado pits are slightly oblong, whereas few are shaped almost like perfect spheres – although all avocado pits have a ‘bottom’ (that is where the roots will grow), and a ‘top’ (from which the sprout will grow). So therefore, the slightly pointier end is the top, and the flat end is the bottom. Therefore, to get your pit to sprout, you should place the bottom root end in water, so it’s very necessary to figure out which end is the ‘top’ and which is the ‘bottom’ before you Pierce it with toothpicks.
avocado tree

3. PIERCE WITH THREE TOOTHPICKS

avocado pit
Provide three toothpicks and pin them at a slight downward angle into the avocado seed, spaced evenly around the circumference of the avocado. You should know that these toothpicks are your avocado scaffolding, which will enable you to rest the bottom half of the avocado in water, with this in mind, the toothpicks should be wedged in there firmly. I recommend sticking them in at a slight angle (pointing down), to ensure that more of your avocado base rests in the water when you set this over a glass.

4. PLACE SEED HALF-SUBMERGED IN A GLASS OF WATER

And set on a quiet windowsill with sunlight. It’s important to use a clear glass to enable you see when roots start to grow, and also when the water needs to be changed. Some professionals recommend to change the water every day, but I discovered, through trial and error, that it’s better to change the water every five days to a week or so. Ensure to change the water regularly, to avoid the growth of mould, bacteria and fungus that will affect the growth of your avocado sprout.

5. WAIT FOR YOUR AVOCADO SEED TO SPROUT

Also, some suggestions states that sprouting can take anywhere from 2-4 weeks, but in my trial, I found out that, it usually takes at least 8 weeks to get a sprout. Below is the process you will witness:

  • The up of the avocado pit will dry out and form a crack, and the outer brown seed skin will slough off.
  • The crack will extend all the way to the bottom of the avocado pit, and through the crack at the bottom, a tiny taproot will begin to emerge.
  • The taproot will now grow longer and longer (and may branch), and eventually a small sprout will peek through the top of the avocado pit.
  • Do not allow your taproot to dry out unsubmerged EVER – it can result to the death of your plant.

6. POT IN SOIL WHEN TREE IS ABOUT 15CM TALL

When the stem is about 16m long, cut it back to about 8cm, this will promote new growth. When it hits 15cm again, pot it up in a rich humus soil in a 25cm diameter pot, now leaving the top half of the seed exposed. Place on a sunny windowsill. Avocados love sun – the more sun the better.

7. WATER AND WATCH IT GROW

Always perform watering regularly with an occasional deep soak. The soil have to be moist, but not saturated. Yellowing leaves are a sign of over-watering; let the plant dry out for a few days.

8. PINCH OUT TOP LEAVES TO ENCOURAGE BUSHINESS

When the stem grows to 12 inches tall, pinch out the top two sets of leaves. This will enable the plant to grow side shoots and more leaves, making it bushy. Each time the plant grows another 6 inches pinch out the 2 newest sets of leaves on top.

TROUBLESHOOTING BUGS

My avocado trees seem to collect aphids – the nasty critters can’t get enough of the delicious avocado leaves. If you get them, here’s how to get rid of them: Wash all of the aphids off the plant by spraying your plant down with a hose outside or in the sink/shower. Once the little pests are off, spray your plant with a mixture of water with a small squirt of dishwashing liquid and a teaspoon of neem oil. This will keep aphids from returning. Check your plant every 4-5 days and re-clean and spray when necessary.

WINTERING

Little avocado trees can kick it outdoors in summer, but if you live anywhere where it gets cooler than 24 degrees celcius, you’ll have to take them back indoors in the fall/winter, before the temperatures fall.

HOW TO GROW AN AVOCADO TREE THAT BEARS FRUIT

This is a frequently asked question about avocado tress. Sometimes avocado plants will start growing fruit after they’re 3 or 4 years old, others may take up to 15+ years to grow fruit, and some never do. It allows to have many avocado trees growing together to aid with pollination. However, don’t expect the fruit to be anything like the avocado that yielded your seed. Commercial avocados are grown from grafted branches to control the outcome of the fruit – a naturally grown avocado may be very different than its parent!

Frenzy valentine Administrator
C.E.O , Myfreshgists

Frenzy valentine ikenna is a passionate blogger and student of university of calabar. He is the founder and editor of myfreshgists.com  connect on Facebook  and Instagram @frenzy_valentine

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